Marvelous Mercy

Mark 5:1-20

1. The disciples and Jesus arrive safely on the other side of the sea, just as Jesus said they would. How has Jesus been true to His word in your life?

2. The demonized man and the community are powerless against the spiritual forces that torment, until Jesus shows up. How has Jesus done what no one else can do in your life or in the lives of those you know?

3. How would you describe the first time you really “saw” Jesus? How did things change from that point forward?

4. How has the reality of evil spiritual forces in this story opened your eyes to the greater struggle around us? What will you do about it?

5. In what ways, to this point in Mark’s Gospel, has Jesus done things that no one else can do? How will that influence your life this week?

6. Why did the demons ask to stay in that country?

7. What is the significance of Jesus sending the demons (in the pigs) into the sea?

8. What is the most common reaction to Jesus’ supernatural power? Why do you think this is?

9. How is the description of the man who had been demon possessed different after the demons are cast out?

10. What is the significance of the phrase “those who had seen it” in 5:17

11. How did the herdsmen demonstrate idolatry in their hearts by their reaction to Jesus? How would you apply this to your own life?

12. How is the final reaction of the man who had the legion different from the herdsmen?

13. Why doesn’t Jesus allow the man to go with Him? What does he tell him to do instead?

14. How would you connect 1 Peter 2:9,10 with this story?

15. Respond to this hymn that we led the sermon with this morning:

“There’s a wideness in God’s mercy,
Like the wideness of the sea;
There’s a kindness in His justice,
Which is more than liberty.
There is no place where earth’s sorrows
Are more felt than up in Heaven;
There is no place where earth’s failings
Have such kindly judgment given.
There is welcome for the sinner,
And more graces for the good;
There is mercy with the Savior;
There is healing in His blood.”
— Frederick W. Faber, “There’s a Wideness in God’s Mercy”